How is Vertov’s writing reflected in his filmmaking?

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54 Responses to “Dziga Vertov”

  1.   Matthew Kruczowy Says:

    -Cinematography must die so that the art of cinema may live.

  2.   Carlene Faith Says:

    “Cinematography” must die so that the art of cinema may live.

  3.   John Malach Says:

    We affirm the future of cinema art by denying the present

  4.   Sinyee Cindy Leung Says:

    We protest against that mixing of the arts which many call sythesis.

  5.   maya1 Says:

    cinematography must die so that so that the art of cinema may live.

  6.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    We proclaim the old films, based on the romance, theatrical films and the like, to be leprous.

  7.   regiesh Says:

    “Cinematography must die so that the art of cinema may live.”

  8.   Beatrice Pana Says:

    Cinematography must die so that the art of cinema may live.

  9.   IJ Says:

    “Cinematography” must die so that the art of cinema may live.

  10.   Jenny Lu Says:

    “Cinematography” must die so that the art of cinema may live.

  11.   Mathias Kranacher Says:

    “To the American adventure film with its showy dynamism and to the dramatization of the American Pinkertons the kinoks say thanks for the rapid shot changes and the close-ups. Good . . . but disorderly, not based on a precise study of movement. A cut above the psychological drama, but still lacking the foundation. A cliché. A copy of a copy.”

  12.   Stephanie Shiwram Says:

    “For his inability to control his movements, we temporarily exclude man as a subject for film.”

  13.   Adrian Lesaru Says:

    Synthesis should come at the summit of each arts achievement and not before

  14.   regiesh Says:

    “Cinematography” must die so that the art of cinema may live.

    The artistic manipulation of the camera should not exist for it tampers with the art of moving picture in itself.

  15.   John Malach Says:

    Cinematography has overtaken the art known as cinema and is causing it to lose its true meaning.

  16.   Sinyee Cindy Leung Says:

    The use of cinematography must stop in order to keep the aesthetic sense of cinema.

  17.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    Its not the word “cinematography” that matters, but the art and beauty it makes.

  18.   Mathias Kranacher Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.

  19.   Carlene Faith Says:

    In order for the true art of a movie to stand out cinematography must be removed.

  20.   Matthew Kruczowy Says:

    The art of cinema is more powerful when the cinematography is less intensive.

  21.   Adrian Lesaru Says:

    cinematography needs to change for the true artistic value of cinema is to be beheld by the world.

  22.   Beatrice Pana Says:

    Cinematography as it is now, in the present, must die so that the art of cinema may grow and expand in the future.

  23.   Jenny Lu Says:

    In order for the art of cinema to live, the work of cinematographic manipulation must come to an end.

  24.   IJ Says:

    To achieve cinematic art we must get rid of artificial cinematography

  25.   maya1 Says:

    cinema cannot stay alive and well if cinematography doesn’t dissappear

  26.   Stephanie Shiwram Says:

    Cinematography is a manipulation that restricts what true art is in film.

  27.   John Malach Says:

    As shown through Avatar once you add so much visually stimulating cinematography you lose all sense of what the film should really be about and only see the CGI graphics.

  28.   Matthew Kruczowy Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Much like the proclaimed “best movie of all time”, Avatar focuses way too hard on the visual candy to the viewer that the real story is unnoticeably patchy and incomplete.

  29.   Carlene Faith Says:

    The true meaning of a film must stay in focus, and the visual aspects cannot be so eccentric that you lose sight of what is truly going on.

  30.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits, and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. An example of these certain techniques that get in the way of fully showing the true art of cinema is the visual effects used in Avatar.

  31.   Adrian Lesaru Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.
    in order for cinema to flow freely you must take precautions when editing, if you add too much color or too many visual distractions then people get drawn away from the plot and what is important in the film

  32.   Jenny Lu Says:

    The manipulation of color for example, though the enhancement or removal of color on a piece of film affects how the audience perceives the work as a whole.

  33.   Mathias Kranacher Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Modern movies like James Cameron’s Avatar, with flashy scenes, expensive explosion’s and enough CGI to take you to the moon, make the view forget what the real meaning of the movies because they are so visual amazed.

  34.   maya1 Says:

    Flow can be easily disrupted when visuals are so heavy that you can’t take accept you’re watching as escapism, its just too outlandish to appreciate.

  35.   IJ Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Manipulating a film (like Avatar) with CGI, and background music takes away from its true meaning.

  36.   Beatrice Pana Says:

    The machine makes us ashamed of man’s inability to control himself, but what are we to do if electricity’s unerring ways are more exciting to us than the disorderly haste of active men and the corrupting inertia of passive ones? We are more interested in the unknown, rather than what we have right here in front of us.

  37.   regiesh Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.
    Using music as an example, though on their own each instruments song, or even as simple as a note may sound pleasing, if mechanically mixed in a seemingly artistic order it becomes overwhelming and discerning to the listener. It’s not aiding to the experience.

  38.   Sinyee Cindy Leung Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.
    Cinematography is just like colors; each color itself is intriguing as every cuts and every edits is artistic but when a filmmaker mixes them into one, into a film, it may be bad and this is not the main thing a filmmaker should do to his film because filmmakers make films in order to express their ideas.

  39.   Stephanie Shiwram Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.

    In the movie Cloverfield, the visuals and special effects visuals were distracting and literally hurt the viewers’ eyes. It may may have given a sense of what it was like in that current situation, but the fast paced, shaky scenes made the viewers feel like they were missing out.

  40.   Sinyee Cindy Leung Says:

    Cinematography is just like colors and film is just like a painting; each color itself is intriguing as every cuts and every edits is artistic but when a filmmaker mixes them into one, into a film, it may be bad and this is not the main thing a filmmaker should do to his film because filmmakers make films in order to express their ideas.

  41.   John Malach Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. As shown through Avatar once you add so much visually stimulating cinematography you lose all sense of what the film should really be about and only see the CGI graphics. Avatar is a prime example because there is a big plot going on in the background that by itself is something beautiful and artistic but with the use of cinematography and “fake” visual effects that whole story line gets shoveled under the carpet and forgotten making the art of cinema the inferior to the visual effects.

  42.   Carlene Faith Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. In the movie Avatar, the visual effects are so eccentric that you lose sight of what is truly going on. Visually you get very distracted and leave the theater not fully understanding what you just watched or why anything happened in the film.

  43.   Adrian Lesaru Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.
    in order for cinema to flow freely you must take precautions when editing, if there are too many visual distractions then people get drawn away from the plot and what is important in the film. If people are distracted by the cinematography then they will not see the art of cinema and to true meaning behind it.

  44.   Matthew Kruczowy Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Much like the proclaimed “best movie of all time”, Avatar focuses way too hard on the visual eye candy to the viewer that the real story is unnoticeably patchy and incomplete. Sure, the scene where the main character rode his first dragon was a very scenic, jaw dropping experience for both the main character and the viewer but where does any of that play any role in what the movie is about? (Forgetting the main characters name at the moment)

  45.   regiesh Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Modern films like James Cameron’s Avatar, with flashy scenes, expensive explosions and an overwhelming degree of CGI to make the view forget what the real meaning of the movies because they are so visual amazed.

    Without the use of high tech effects it is possible that the viewer would find a clearer understanding of the actual story line which has been taken away by such meaningless flashiness.

  46.   Carlene Faith Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. In the movie Avatar, the visual effects are so eccentric that the audience loses sight of what is truly going on. Visually getting very distracted and leaving the theater not fully understanding what you just watched or why anything happened in the film.

  47.   Mathias Kranacher Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Modern movies like James Cameron’s Avatar, with its flashy scenes, expensive explosion’s and enough CGI to take you to the moon, makes the viewer forget what the real meaning of the movie is because they are so visually amazed. This is a good example as to why cinematography should not interfere with cinema because the CGI took the viewer away from the whole plot of Avatar. The plot was bypassed because people where to busy looking at the moons of Pandora.

  48.   Sinyee Cindy Leung Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.
    Cinematography is just like colors; each color itself is intriguing as every cuts and every edits is artistic but when a filmmaker mixes them into one, into a film, it may be bad and this is not the main thing a filmmaker should do to his film because filmmakers make films in order to express their ideas. The film, Written on the Wind, every scenes of it is artistic that the use of color is very intensive and it makes the film too much unnecessary details; those unnecessary details makes the film more confusing to people.

  49.   Stephanie Shiwram Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant.
    Cinematography should allow film to flow freely but precisely. Visuals and special effects such as the ones used in the film Cloverfield, distract the viewer and could literally hurt the viewer’s eyes. It also takes away what the viewer really wants to see such as the monster and at the end of the film makes the viewer question what did they pay money to see.

  50.   Jenny Lu Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. The manipulation of color for example in the film The Wizard of Oz, uses the enhancement and removal of color to help convey that life on Kansas is different from the magical world of Oz. The black and white in the beginning of the film when Dorothy is in Kansas shows that life is boring or bland there compared to the world of Oz which is colorful and lively. This simple transition of color affects how the audience perceives the work as a whole and provokes new emotions.

  51.   maya1 Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits, and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. In Avatar, flow was easily disrupted due to the heavy use of colors and visuals and one can’t take it as escapism, its just too outlandish to appreciate. When there are heavy visuals and colors on screen as much as they were in Avatar, its hard to sit there and take it in when one is constantly forced out of the world of the movie because the visuals are so hard to look at for so long.

  52.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits, and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. An example of these certain techniques that get in the way of fully showing the true art of cinema is the visual effects used in Avatar. These techniques, especially the special effects, took away the overall plot of Avatar, and made it more of eye-candy, rather than a movie with a story.

  53.   IJ Says:

    Cinema must be able to flow freely, without cuts, edits and visual distraction so that the art of cinema is to remain dominant. Manipulating a film (like Avatar) with CGI and background music takes away from its true meaning. The CGI and music serve more as a distraction than a contribution to the art of the film.

  54.   Reading Film » Assessing Kino-Pravdas Says:

    […] In the comments section of this post is where you identified the most important idea in Vertov’s […]

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