http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeKvQ3X2bL0

Kino-Pravda Script

1. Banner of Queens College. Then text over the image stating “Queens College strives for academic excellence and the ability to express our knowledge in a clear and coherent matter so that we may serve our community in a positive way where ever we may go.”

2. Followed by a fade out and long shot of the sunset seen from the end of QC campus.  Also how the sky with birds flying. Then have text over image stating “Learning and creativity doesn’t stand still at night. It transcends to the following day.”

3. Fade into long shot of the quad then zoom in as we go towards the center. Shot of a person walking by.  Then have text over the images stating “We are here for one purpose and that purpose is to obtain knowledge so we can give back to the community in the future.”

4. Fade into close up of leaves on a branch then zoom out. Hoover from side to side to show the branches of the plant. Then have text over lap the image stating “Sasson Soffer (1923 – ) came to the United States in 1950 and enrolled in Brooklyn College where he was highly interested in the study and practice of making art. He became particularly interested in large- scale sculptures.”

5.  Scene walking past the bushes and a person. Followed by slowly going towards the sculptures. Have text overlap the image stating “Soffer is a strong believer in giving back to the community and encourages his children and grandchildren to honor institutions by giving back to the Colleges and Universities of the City of New York which provided them their education. “

6. Medium shot of the sculptures and then have text come up that says “These two sculptures titled Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance are gifts from Soffer’s grandchildren Samuel Liberman and Eve Liberman (children of Peter Liberman, Prof. of Political Science at QC and Sarah Soffer.  (Suzanna Simor)”

7. Medium shot of the sculptures seen from the front view. Have text overlap the image stating “These sculptures were installed on May 17, 2007.”

8.  Fade into a blank screen stating “Recently President James L. Muyskens announced that these sculptures will be torn down and replaced with vending machines.”

9.  Fade into picture of the area where the sculptures were originally placed except have vending machines (in black and white) in its place. Then have text appear on the image stating “What would this convey about Queens College?”

10.  Blank screen stating “Possibly that… “

11.  Blank screen stating “Queens College is a money hungry institution that looks pass creativity? Or is it that,”

12.  Blank screen stating “Queens College doesn’t care about its students and encourages students to buy unhealthy food? And last but not least,”

13.  Blank screen stating “Queens College is hypocritical and goes against everything it stands for.”

14.  Long shot of the music building and students walking as we get to the sculptures. Then have words come up stating “This is what students and faculty had to say about the matter.”

15.  Shot of first student.  Ask him the following questions: What are your feelings towards the sculptures Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance? What are your thoughts on the removal of the sculptures to make room for vending machines?

16.  Shot of second student and occasionally hover to show the sculptures when she is looking at them.  Ask her the following questions:  What do you think about these sculptures? Do you think these sculptures serve a purpose in the community and why?

17.  Shot of professor. Ask him the following questions: How do you feel about these sculptures and the removal of them? Why do you feel that way?

18.  Shot of another student. Ask her what her thoughts are on in the removal of these sculptures to make room for vending machines.

19.  Blank screen that states “Despite the various views on Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance, nonetheless, replacing these sculptures with vending machines shows Queens College in a negative light.”

20.  Transition to a new blank screen that states “Queens College will be sending the message that creativity isn’t acknowledged, but that making money and promoting unhealthy food is more important.”

21.  Shot of a tree near the QC playground with two squirrels. One is going up the tree while the other is on the ground. Have text overlap the screen stating “Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance are located near the children’s playground, surrounded by trees and nature’s thriving organisms.”

22.  Use observational documentarie in these shots however take away the special effects and have sound to make the setting more “real”. Have text throughout the scenes that say: “These sculptures were created in 1957 out of one-inch carbon steel plates that were sandblasted and allowed to weather in salt-water air.” “The sculptures were built at the T.W. Dick factory in Grander, Maine. Soffer created a protective coating with a warm orange patina, which will remain its surface identity forever.  (Suzanna Simor)” “Sasson Soffer wanted his sculptures to be placed outdoors and was extremely picky when it came to placing them.” “By declaring that he wanted them to be placed in nature show his sculptures in a different light.” “Essentially, Soffer wants to convey that his sculptures are forever changing just as nature and its seasons, as well as people over a period of time due to the forces of nature.”  “These sculptural pieces have many interesting angles.” “Some proportions are symmetrical, while others are asymmetrical and abstract.” “The sculpture’s abstract nature and indefinite forms not only make them interesting to look at,” “however also evoke our minds to try and interpret it.”

23.  Medium shot of the sculptures.

24.  Fade into a blank screen stating “The value of art can’t be determined in a straightforward and rational way.”

25.  Then another blank screen stating “However it would be irresponsible to say that these sculptures hold no value at all on campus.”

26.  Blank screen stating “On behalf of the students and faculty who deeply admire these sculptures,”

27.  Blank screen  stating “and Sasson Soffer who has worked hard on these two sculptures to simply give them away as gifts to the QC community…”

28.  Blank screen stating “I ask you to please help preserve Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance from being destroyed.”

29.  Credits. “Thank you for watching.” Directed by: Jenny Lu. Information obtained from: Suzanna Simor. English 110: Professor Ferguson

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9 Responses to “Kino-Pravda Film Essay”

  1.   Sinyee Cindy Leung Says:

    I really like how you put two vending machines pictures in the video to let people know what the place would look like if the art pieces were replaced!!! I was surprised!!!
    However, I found little bit difficulty in reading the text on screen because the camera moves a lot.

  2.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    The camera going through the pink flowers is VERY striking. It both caught my attention immediately and gave a pretty good intro to the film essay.

  3.   IJ Says:

    I really liked your film, especially the opening. How did you get that shot of the birds? Did they just happen to fly by while you were filming? I agree with Cindy about the pics of the vending machines. It’s kind of funny just seeing them plopped on the grass.

  4.   Beatrice Pana Says:

    I love your film. I think your script was very detailed and exactly what the assignment called for. I love the way you went into complete detail in number 22. I feel like, with your script, a person who does not know anything about your artwork could just follow your steps and create a similar film to yours.

  5.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    Zarraf Choudhury 12-6-10

    Queens College

    English 110

    Program Notes: Jenny Lu

    Jenny Lu’s 2010 film Kino Pravda explores the ideas of Dziga Vertov and his belief that “cinematography’ must die so that the art of cinema may live.” Jenny’s Kino Pravda film essay on a group of sculptures in the campus of Queens College masterfully captures Vertov’s radical thinking, as well as his unusual style of filmmaking.
    What is Kino Pravda? It was a news reel series created by Dziga Vertov. Its literal definition is “Film Truth.” Made in the 1920s, Vertov used clips of what seemed like random moments in everyday-life, and put them together to form a deeper meaning. These news reels were very experimental during that time, often being completely ignored by film critics. However, later years, he was applauded for his efforts for doing something entirely different. Jenny Lu does something similar with her film, but with a clear subject- The Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance sculptures.
    Jenny Lu is a freshman at Queens College, the location of those sculptures. She has three films prior to her Kino Pravda, two of which also relate to the sculptures- an Observational Documentary and a Community Interview Film. Her Observational Documentary consists of many different shots and angles of the sculptures and their surrounding area. The Community Interview Film consists of Jenny interviewing students and faculty regarding the art pieces. Some found it interesting, while others didn’t seem to like it.
    The art pieces, a Jenny points out in her Kino Pravda film, were created in 1957 out of carbon steel. The creator Sassons Saffer was born in Iraq. After coming to the United States, he enrolled in Brooklyn College in New York City. Later in his life, he built his sculptures in Maine, and he wanted his works to be “placed outdoors” and was “very picky” about the location. In the end, he located The Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance sculptures near the children’s playground on the Queens College Campus.
    The Kino Pravda film begins with shots of the college itself, including its banner and the campus, shot beautifully against the sunset. Images of pink flowers are seen until we see The Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance sculptures. Throughout the scene Jenny puts in specific information, regarding both Saffer and his art pieces. We finally see the reason why Jenny has made this Kino Pravda- to stop the president of Queens College from putting in vending machines over the sculptures. Does she succeed?
    Using similar methods as Vertov, Jenny brings to light a problem of taking down art for machines. She uses striking images of flowers and a sunset to set the tone, and uses information gathered through research to add background to everything she films. A viewer can tell that she was very dedicated in her work, and it shows, especially when she calls out the college and the president himself and asks if what they’re doing is right.
    Although it isn’t as radical and different as Vertov’s Kino Pravda, Jenny’s Kino Pravda manages to make and send a deep message of what is right and what is wrong. Instead of using clips of very different items, she uses very different film techniques and genres to put her film together, and bring to light to what she stands for.

  6.   Zarraf Choudhury Says:

    Zarraf Choudhury 12-6-10

    Queens College

    English 110

    Program Notes: Jenny Lu

    Jenny Lu’s 2010 film Kino Pravda explores the ideas of Dziga Vertov and his belief that “cinematography’ must die so that the art of cinema may live.” Jenny’s Kino Pravda film essay on a group of sculptures in the campus of Queens College masterfully captures Vertov’s radical thinking, as well as his unusual style of filmmaking.

    What is Kino Pravda? It was a news reel series created by Dziga Vertov. Its literal definition is “Film Truth.” Made in the 1920s, Vertov used clips of what seemed like random moments in everyday-life, and put them together to form a deeper meaning. These news reels were very experimental during that time, often being completely ignored by film critics. However, later years, he was applauded for his efforts for doing something entirely different. Jenny Lu does something similar with her film, but with a clear subject- The Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance sculptures.

    Jenny Lu is a freshman at Queens College, the location of those sculptures. She has three films prior to her Kino Pravda, two of which also relate to the sculptures- an Observational Documentary and a Community Interview Film. Her Observational Documentary consists of many different shots and angles of the sculptures and their surrounding area. The Community Interview Film consists of Jenny interviewing students and faculty regarding the art pieces. Some found it interesting, while others didn’t seem to like it.
    The art pieces, a Jenny points out in her Kino Pravda film, were created in 1957 out of carbon steel. The creator Sassons Saffer was born in Iraq. After coming to the United States, he enrolled in Brooklyn College in New York City. Later in his life, he built his sculptures in Maine, and he wanted his works to be “placed outdoors” and was “very picky” about the location. In the end, he located The Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance sculptures near the children’s playground on the Queens College Campus.

    The Kino Pravda film begins with shots of the college itself, including its banner and the campus, shot beautifully against the sunset. Images of pink flowers are seen until we see The Romanesque Remembrance and Gothic Remembrance sculptures. Throughout the scene Jenny puts in specific information, regarding both Saffer and his art pieces. We finally see the reason why Jenny has made this Kino Pravda- to stop the president of Queens College from putting in vending machines over the sculptures. Does she succeed?

    Using similar methods as Vertov, Jenny brings to light a problem of taking down art for machines. She uses striking images of flowers and a sunset to set the tone, and uses information gathered through research to add background to everything she films. A viewer can tell that she was very dedicated in her work, and it shows, especially when she calls out the college and the president himself and asks if what they’re doing is right.

    Although it isn’t as radical and different as Vertov’s Kino Pravda, Jenny’s Kino Pravda manages to make and send a deep message of what is right and what is wrong. Instead of using clips of very different items, she uses very different film techniques and genres to put her film together, and bring to light to what she stands for.

  7.   Jenny Lu Says:

    Thank you to everyone who watched and or commented on my video! :D
    @ Cindy and Ikey
    Yeah putting the vending machines there was suppose to be a bit humorous, haha. But I was just trying to prove how terrible it would look if the sculptures were removed and replaced with vending machines.
    and @ Ikey yeah, when I was filming that afternoon the birds did just happen to fly across the sky while I was shooting. :)

  8.   Beatrice Pana Says:

    Kino-Pravda Film Essay is a film created by young director and full-time college student Jenny Lu. The film is set on the Queens College Campus in Flushing, NY and is targeted towards the vast Queens College audience. The fictionalized scenario was that these sculptures would be replaced with a vending machine, however, this will not be happening in reality. The film argues against the replacement of the Romanesque and Gothic Remembrance sculptures through the presentation of Jenny Lu’s Observational Documentary and the Community Interview. The student was asked, as part of an assignment for her English 110 class to investigate the sculpture, its importance on the Queens College campus, faculty and students’ opinions on it, etc.

    Queens College is one of the many City Universities of New York. It has a rich and bold campus. The campus provides its’ students and faculty with not only beautiful architecture, but various types of pieces of artwork and sculptures. Two of these sculptures are the Romanesque and Gothic Remembrance sculptures.

    Ms. Lu settles on a very simple, yet sophisticated style for her work. This can easily be seen through her elegant introduction to the Queens College campus and the college’s mission. As she takes her viewers on a journey, she makes sure to explain every shot it is shown. Before actually presenting us with her sculptures, she simplifies the artist’s background, as well as, his focus while creating these sculptors.

    This film is based on the beliefs of Dziga Vertov. Dziga Vertov was a film director/theorist whose belief was that in order to capture film truth or Kino-Pravda, one must observe the subject or topic in its own natural setting, and watch the it through the camera lens. He also believed that the human eye is inferior to the camera lens, hence, stating that “We cannot make our eyes better than they have been made, but the movie camera we can perfect forever.”

    As Jenny Lu mentioned, “Sasson Soffer [the artist] came to the US in 1950 and enrolled in Brooklyn College.” “Soffer is a strong believer in giving back to the community and encourages his children and grandchildren to honor institutions by giving back to the schools that provided them their education.” So therefore, Soffer’s grandchildren provided these two sculptures to Queens College. Soffer was born in Baghdad and was of a Jewish background. He began creating sculptures around the late 20th century. In his artworks, he used an abstract and contextual style. The Romanesque and Gothic Remembrance Sculptures both resemble the abstract style I mentioned. They don’t portray the look of an ordinary, daily object, but rather look like objects from within the limits of one’s imagination.

    Ms. Lu ends her film by questioning the sculptures value on campus and how their replacement would affect all of Queens College. After which she initiates a plea for these famous sculptures should be kept. Now, if this film does not provoke the audience to get up and save these beautiful sculptures, than I do not know what will.

  9.   Brad Bujan Says:

    Zarraf I liked the way you explained Dziga Vertovs view of cinema and the way he percieved it should be shot. I enjoyed the way you pointed out how Jenny used her Kino Pravda as a means to an end which was to save the artwork on Queens campus. Aside from that you gave a brief summary of what the piece she was filming was a bout which resulted in an audience who would not be familiar with the piece to understand it a bit better.

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